Schuck
Names
Grasnovatka, Grjasnowatka, Gryznovatka, Partizanskoye, Schuch, Schuchow, Schuchowaki, Schuck
Location
50º47' N 45º20' E
History
      Schuck was founded as a Roman Catholic colony on 18 July 1766 by 29 families from the Palatinate and Mainz who had been recruited by Baron de Boffe. Eight additional families arrived on 1 May 1767. The colony was named after its first leader, Jakob Schuck. By decree, it was given the Russian name of Gryaznovatka on 26 February 1768.
      On 16 September 1941, the inhabitants of Schuck were deported and distributed to villages and districts of the Krasnoyarsk Territory of Siberia. From 1942 to 1944, the village was used as a prison camp by the NKVD, with the prisoners engaged in agriculture. The colony no longer exists, having been raised completely sometime in the mid-1980s (it appears on topographical maps in 1981, but not in 1987).
Church
      The congregation in Schuck was the lead church in the Schuck Parish. A wooden church was constructed in Schuck in 1857 dedicated to St. Anthony of Padua. A new church building made of stone was planned with construction to begin in 1903. This new building was apparently never built. The church was eventually closed by Soviet authorities and used as a granary. In 1936, the building was dismantled and the lumber used to built a new sarpinka weaving factory.
Priests
      The congregation in Schuck was served by the following priests:
Raphael Zubowitsch (Mar. 1803-2 Aug. 1808)
Theodosius Kalluha (3 Aug. 1808-Sep. 1820)
Peter Glaßmann (1887)
Stanislaus Kubic (1902-?)
Augustin Gabel (1904-1911)
Raphael Loran (1901-1904?)
Johannes Herrmann (1910?-1916)
Adam Bellendir (1916-1930/1931)
Population
Population Table
Year
Households
Population
Total
Male
Female
1766
29
91
50
41
1767
37
126
65
61
1769
36
124
66
58
1773
36
160
81
79
1788
31
197
102
95
1798
31
223
112
111
1816
44
347
176
171
1834
72
594
304
290
1850
84
894
447
447
1857
115
1,010
519
491
1859
85
1,049
540
509
1886
191
1,467
755
712
1891
178
1,772
901
871
1894
186
1,660
906
754
1897
1,677
847
830
1905
1,778
1911
233
1,734
893
841
1920
277
1,895
1922
282
1,560
742
818
1926*
362
1,874
892
982
1931
2,141
*Of whom 1,872 were German (360 households: 892 male & 980 female).
Sources:
- Beratz, Gottieb. The German colonies on the Lower Volga, their origin and early development: a memorial for the 150th anniversary of the arrival of the first German settlers on the Volga, 29 June 1764. Translated by Adam Giesinger (Lincoln, NE: American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, 1991): 353.
- Mink, A.N. Historical and Geographical Dictionary of the Saratov Province [in Russian] (Saratov, Russia, 1898): 183-185.
- Orlov, Gregorii. Report of Conditions of Settlements on the Volga to Catherine II, 14 February 1769.
- Pallas, P.S. Reise durch verschiedene Provinzen des Russischen Reichs. Theil 3,2, Reise aus Sibirien zurueck an die Wolga im 1773sten Jahr (St. Petersburg: Kaiserl. Academie der Wissenschaften, 1776): 623.
- Pleve, Igor. Einwanderung in das Wolgagebiet, 1764-1767 Band 4 (Göttingen: Göttinger Arbeitskreis, 2008): 11, 111-118.
- Pleve, Igor R. The German Colonies on the Volga: The Second Half of the Eighteenth Century, translated by Richard Rye (Lincoln, NE: American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, 2001): 320.
- Preliminary Results of the Soviet Census of 1926 on the Volga German Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic (Pokrovsk, 1927): 28-83.
- Schnurr, Joseph, Die Kirchen und das Religiöse Leben der Russlanddeutschen - Katholischer Teil (Stuttgart: Selbstverlag Joseph Schnurr, 1980): 251.
- "Settlements in the 1897 Census." Journal of the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia (Winter, 1990): 18.
External Links
- History of the Village of Schuck (Andrei Mushty) - in Russian
- Schuck (wolgadeutsche.net) - in Russian
Last updated 31 May 2013.
Map showing Schuck (1935).


Map of Schuck
Source: shuck.ucoz.ru