Schilling
Names
Schilling, Sosnovka, Sosnowka
Location
50º37' N 44º33' E
History
      The Lutheran colony of Schilling was founded by 96 families from the Palatinate and Alsace on 14 August 1764. They had been recruited by the Government. By decree on 26 February 1768, the colony received the Russian name of Sosnovka.
      In 1859, 128 colonists moved to the daughter colony of Neu-Beideck along the banks of the Jeruslan River. They were joined in 1881 by another 48 colonists.
      Schilling was a port colony, with large commercial cargo and passenger docks capable of handling 700 thousand tons of cargo per year. The port in Schilling received shipment of relief supplies during the 1921 Famine to the colonies on the Bergseite.
      From 19-22 September 1917, the Second Congress of the Volga Germans was held in Schilling. Soviet Communist Party leader H.A. Luft (1899-1937) was born in Schilling. Physician and anthropologist P.K. Haller (1858-1920) and writer P. Sinner (1879-?) were also born in Schilling.
      Immigration from Schilling to American began in 1874 and continued through 1878. Immigration resumed from 1881-1886.
Church
      Schilling was part of the Beideck parish during the early years. A wooden church was constructed in 1883, and its ruins remain visible today.
Pastors
      The congregation in Schilling was served by the following pastors:
Population
Population Table
Year
Households
Population
Total
Male
Female
1769
96
404
199
205
1773
95
429
215
214
1788
91
532
271
261
1798
94
626
312
314
1816
118
851
436
415
1834
180
1,295
676
619
1850
174
1,839
965
874
1857
200
1,966
1,034
932
1859
170
1,992
1,046
946
1886
283
2,098
1,080
1,018
1891
270
2,686
1,325
1,361
1894
303
2,588
1,288
1,300
1897
3,245*
1,278
1,967
1904
3,068
1910
3,388
1912
3,564
1920
530**
3,076
1922
2,801
1923
2,674
1926***
598
3,210
1,563
1,647
1931
3,411****
*Of whom 3,175 were German.
**Of which 513 households were German.
***Of whom 3,088 were German (542 households: 1,490 male & 1,598 female).
****Of whom 3,380 were German.
Sources:
- Beratz, Gottieb. The German colonies on the Lower Volga, their origin and early development: a memorial for the 150th anniversary of the arrival of the first German settlers on the Volga, 29 June 1764. Translated by Adam Giesinger (Lincoln, NE: American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, 1991): 352.
- Diesendorf, V.F. Die Deutschen Russlands : Siedlungen und Siedlungsgebiete : Lexicon. Moscow, 2006.
- List of Settlements in the Russian Empire in 1859, vol. 38: Saratov Province (St. Petersburg, 1862): p.58.
- Mink, A.N. Historical and Geographical Dictionary of the Saratov Province [in Russian] (Saratov, Russia, 1898): 962-967.
- Orlov, Gregorii. Report of Conditions of Settlements on the Volga to Catherine II, 14 February 1769.
- Pallas, P.S. Reise durch verschiedene Provinzen des Russischen Reichs. Theil 3,2, Reise aus Sibirien zurueck an die Wolga im 1773sten Jahr (St. Petersburg: Kaiserl. Academie der Wissenschaften, 1776): 621.
- Pleve, Igor R. The German Colonies on the Volga: The Second Half of the Eighteenth Century, translated by Richard Rye (Lincoln, NE: American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, 2001): 318.
- Preliminary Results of the Soviet Census of 1926 on the Volga German Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic (Pokrovsk, 1927): 28-83.
- Schnurr,Joseph, Die Kirchen und das Religiöse Leben der Russlanddeutschen, Evangelischer Teil (Stuttgart: AER Verlag Landsmannschaft der Deutschen aus Rußland, 1978): 191.
- "Settlements in the 1897 Census." Journal of the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia (Winter, 1990): 19.
External Links
Schilling (Wolgadeutsche.net)
Village of Schilling (Gary Martens)
Last updated 24 April 2014.
Map showing Schilling (1935).

Painting of Schilling, Russia by artist Michael Boss.

Remains of the Schilling Lutheran Church (circa 2000).
The building has been subsequently torn down.

Schilling Lutheran Church.

Former store in Schilling (2001).
Source: Steve Schreiber.

German house in Schilling (2001).
Source: Steve Schreiber.