Nieder-Monjou
Names
Bobrovka, Bobrowka, Niedermonjou, Niedermonschu, Nieder-Monjou
Location
51º38' N 46º38' E
History
      Nieder-Monjou was founded as a Lutheran colony on 7 June 1767 by Baron Caneau de Beauregard 49 versts northeast of Saratov. The name of the village derives from Beauregard's assistant, Otto Friedrich von Monjou. The Russian naming decree of 26 February 1768 permitted the colony to retain the name of Nieder-Monjou. Sometime between 1859-1867, Nieder-Monjou also became known by the Russian name Bobrovka which is sometimes seen in the German form, Bobrowka.
Church
      Nieder-Monjou was founded as a Lutheran colony, and its congregation was part of the Süd-Katharinenstadt parish until 1905 when the two parishes in Katharinenstadt merged. At that time new "lead parishes" were established in Paulskaya and Boisroux. The pastor at Paulskaya served the four congregations at Paulskaya, Fischer, Beauregard, and Nieder-Monjou. He held church services at Nieder-Monjou once a month. The remainder of the time church services were conducted by the schoolmaster (Schulmeister).
      A new church building was constructed in 1828. What remains of this structure now serves as the community library.
Pastors
      The congregation in Nieder-Monjou was served by the following pastors:
Population
Population Table
Year
Households
Population
Total
Male
Female
1767
88
279
143
136
1769
87
308
154
154
1773
81
349
175
174
1788
55
295
149
146
1798
63
362
182
180
1816
83
597
297
300
1834
125
1,007
506
501
1850
184
1,405
688
717
1857
157
1,748
827
921
1859
1,480
1883
2,449
1889
2,702
1897
2,915*
1,483
1,432
1904
3,868
1910
349
4,216
2,083
2,133
1912
4,201
1920
487
3,798
1922
2,148
1923
2,100
1926**
476
2,732
1,354
1,378
1931
3,643***
*Of whom 2,902 were German.
**Of whom 2,652 (1,274 male & 1,378 female) were German living in 473 households.
***Of whom 3,630 were German.
Sources:
- Amburger, Erik. Die Pastoren der evangelischen Kirchen Rußlands vom Ende des 16. Jahrhunderts bis 1937: Ein biographisches Lexikon (Erlangen: Martin-Luther-Verlag, 1998).
- Beratz, Gottieb. The German colonies on the Lower Volga, their origin and early development: a memorial for the 150th anniversary of the arrival of the first German settlers on the Volga, 29 June 1764. Translated by Adam Giesinger (Lincoln, NE: American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, 1991): 351.
- Diesendorf, V.F. Die Deutschen Russlands : Siedlungen und Siedlungsgebiete : Lexicon. Moscow, 2006.
- Dietz, Jacob E. History of the Volga German Colonists. Lincoln, NE: American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, 2005.
- Klaus, A.A. Our Colonies (Saint Petersburg, Russia, 1869): 2:14; 4:56-57.
- List of the Populated Places of the Samara Province (Samara, Russia, 1910): 325.
- Orlov, Gregorii. Report of Conditions of Settlements on the Volga to Catherine II, 14 February 1769.
- Pallas, P.S. Reise durch verschiedene Provinzen des Russischen Reichs. Theil 3,2, Reise aus Sibirien zurueck an die Wolga im 1773sten Jahr (St. Petersburg: Kaiserl. Academie der Wissenschaften, 1776): 613.
- Preliminary Totals of the All-Union Population Census of 1926 for the Volga German ASSR (Pokrovsk, Russia, 1927): 28-83.
- "Settlements in the 1897 Census." Journal of the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia (Winter, 1990): 17.
Resources
External Links
- 1857 Census of Nieder-Monjou (in German)
- Nieder-Monjou Russia (Steven Grau & Michael Grau)
- Nieder-Monjou (Wolgadeutsche.net) - in Russian
- Photos of Nieder-Monjou (Wolgadeutsche.net)
Last updated 31 May 2013.
Map showing Nieder-Monjou (1935).


Building in Nieder-Monjou.
Courtesy of Tim Weeder (2001).


River below Nieder-Monjou which is on the bank to the right.
Courtesy of Tim Weeder (2001).


Nieder-Monjou street scene with the Lutheran church in the center.
Source: Nieder-Monjou Website.


What remains of Nieder-Monjou's former Lutheran Church now serves as the community library.
Source: E. Moshkova (2010) as posted to wolgadeutsche.net.


Wind orchestra (Blasorchester)
in Nieder-Monjou.
Second from the left (back row) is David Müller, son of Heinrich Müller and Dorothea née Rüb.
Source: Katharina Dawydow.