Gazetteer > Oranienbaum
Oranienbaum
Location
59º55' N 29º45' E
Names
Lomonosov, Oranienbaum
History
Located on the southern coast of the Gulf of Finland 40 kilometers west of St. Petersburg itself, Oranienbaum (meaning "orange tree" in German) was the port of entry for the colonists enroute to the Volga. The first colonists arrived in the autumn of 1763 and spring of 1764.

The royal palace at Oranienbaum was built from 1710 to 1727 by Aleksandr Danilovich Menshikov, a close associate of Peter the Great. The architects Giovanni Mario Fontana and Gottfried Shadel were commissioned to build it. After Peter's death, the palace confiscated and in 1743 became the summer residence of the Peter the Great's grandson, Peter III, husband of the future Catherine the Great. The place was reconstructed by Bartolomeo Francesco Rastrelli. There are several palaces and pavillions among the lavishly planned gardens and parks of "The Grand Palace" as Oranienbaum was often called. This is the only palace in the vicinity of St. Petersburg that was not captured by the invading Germans during the 872-day siege of St. Petersburg (1941-1944).

In 1948, Oranienbaum was renamed Lomonosov in honor of Mikhail Lomonosov who in 1754 had founded a colored-glass factory near there. Today Lomonosov is a suburb of St. Petersburg.

External Links
- Lomonosov, Russia (Wikipedia)
- Oranienbaum, Russia (Wikipedia)
- St. Petersburg, Russia (Wikipedia)
Sources:
Dietz, Jacob E. History of the Volga German Colonists (Lincoln, NE: American Historical Society of Germans from Russia, 2005): 52.
Last update 16 March 2009.


Barracks where colonists stayed
in Oranienbaum (2001).
Photo courtesy of Richard A. Kraus.


Barracks where colonists stayed
in Oranienbaum (2001).
Photo courtesy of Richard A. Kraus.


Barracks where colonists stayed
in Oranienbaum (2001).
Photo courtesy of Richard A. Kraus.